Synthesis by Jeffrey Bland
“ We need to listen to the patients' story and develop a response to it. The approach to complex syndromes may be much more profound than just trying to point a round peg into a square hole and get a singular diagnosis. ”
Jeffrey S. Bland, PhD

Posted by: Synthesis Staff

Posted date: 05/24/2011

IFM press release: "Pioneering thought-leader of functional medicine receives Linus Pauling Functional Medicine Lifetime Achievement Award"

Though chronic health conditions such as high blood pressure, obesity, diabetes, and heart disease are reducing our life expectancy, according to a recent New England Journal of Medicine article (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15784668), they can be prevented, managed, and perhaps even reversed. Jeffrey Bland, PhD has devoted his life to helping people realize optimal health by addressing the causes of impaired metabolism and physiology, then applying individualized responses. Dr. Bland has inspired many with his groundbreaking work in the fields of nutrition and nutrigenomics—the study of the effects of foods and food constituents on gene expression.

On the occasion of The Institute for Functional Medicine’s 2011 International Symposium, held April 28–30 in Bellevue, Washington, Jeffrey Bland, PhD was honored by receiving the Linus Pauling Functional Medicine Lifetime Achievement Award. He and his wife, Susan Bland, founded the Institute 20 years ago.

Functional medicine offers an answer to the current epidemic of chronic disease, with its systems-based, science-driven approach to individualized medicine, focusing on underlying causes rather than simply treating symptoms. Considered the “Father of Functional Medicine,” Bland’s vision, brilliance, and leadership have inspired a worldwide community of clinicians, scientists, and educators to transform clinical practice and educational curricula.

Today’s new medicine offers a changing view of physiology, more like a patient-specific “dance of metabolism” where genetic expression can actually be changed by intervening in core functional processes in the body such as cellular metabolism, digestive function, detoxification, and oxidative stress. As function is regulated, illness can be modulated.

In Bland’s words, “We need to listen to the patient’s story and develop a response to it. The approach to complex syndromes may be much more profound than just trying to pound a round peg into a square hole to get a singular diagnosis.”

With a PhD in biochemistry, Bland became a prominent educator for the natural foods Industry, served as President of the Northwest Academy of Preventive Medicine, and helped establish Bastyr University of Natural Health Sciences in the Northwest. In 1981 he was invited by two-time Nobel Laureate Linus Pauling to become the Director of Nutritional Supplement Analysis at the Linus Pauling Institute in Palo Alto, California. In 1984 he introduced the concept of using foods to create biochemical change, and started HealthComm, Inc. to educate physicians and other licensed healthcare providers. Jeffrey and his wife Susan established The Institute for Functional Medicine in 1991 to educate clinicians about functional medicine. In 1993, he established the Natural Products Quality Assurance Alliance to develop the quality assurance document for the industry. Bland is the Chief Science Officer of Metagenics, the largest global nutraceutical and medical food company serving the fields of functional and integrative medicine.

His publications include four books on nutrition and health for the general public and six books for health professionals, including The Medical Applications of Clinical Nutrition. He is the principal author of more than 100 peer-reviewed research papers on nutritional biochemistry.

To learn more about The Institute for Functional Medicine, visit www.functionalmedicine.org, or call Laurie Hofmann, MPH, Executive Director, at 505.471.9020505.471.9020. To contact Jeffrey Bland, PhD, visit www.jeffreybland.com.

 

 

 

Posted by: Synthesis Staff

Posted date: 05/19/2011

Mark Hyman's TEDMED talk on a systems approach to medicine

Mark Hyman explains why diseases don't exist and explains the "medicine of why," functional medicine, to get the causes


 

 

Posted by: Synthesis Staff

Posted date: 05/16/2011

New research on soy

Dr. Bland discusses his upcoming interview with Dr. Edwin Lephart of Brigham Young University on new research on soy. Look for the interview in the July issue of FMU. (The photo in the background is just a coincidence!)


 

 

Posted by: Synthesis Staff

Posted date: 05/11/2011

IFM Symposium 2011- Dr. Mehmet Oz congratulates Dr. Bland on his Linus Pauling Lifetime Achievement Award

Synthesis and Jeffrey Bland congratulate Dr. Oz on two Emmy nominations. And how does Dr. Oz congratulate Jeffrey Bland? “I love you, man!” Listen now:


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Posted by: Synthesis Staff

Posted date: 05/11/2011

IFM Symposium 2011- Jeff's right hand, Kathy Sawyer

Have you ever considered what it would be like to be Jeff Bland's right hand? To be responsible for juggling his calls, meetings, mail, speaking schedule, and travel arrangements? Only one person in the world truly knows: Kathy Sawyer, his assistant of 15 years. Listen to Kathy describe what her daily life is like in "the world of Jeffrey Bland." She prepared this video tribute for his recent award ceremony.

 

Posted by: Synthesis Staff

Posted date: 05/09/2011

IFM Symposium 2011- Glenn Doman's congratulations

During the presentation of the Linus Pauling Lifetime Achievement Award at the IFM Symposium, Dr. Bland received some congratulatory wishes via video. One video featured Glenn Doman, now 92 years old, founder of the Institutes for the Achievement of Human Potential, first recipient of the Linus Pauling Functional Medicine award, and longtime mentor to Dr. Bland. Here is the isolated audio of Mr. Doman’s heartfelt congratulations.

 

 

Posted by: Synthesis Staff

Posted date: 05/03/2011

IFM Symposium 2011- Dr. Bland/Dr. Hyman interview


Go behind the scenes! Jeff Bland and Dr. Mark Hyman interviewed one another at the annual IFM Symposium in Bellevue, WA last weekend. Some of the interview will be featured in the May 2011 issue of Functional Medicine Update coming out this month. Here’s a preview: “Epic things have gone on this week in the functional medicine revolution.” (Jeff Bland, 4/30/2011)


 

 

Posted by: Synthesis Staff

Posted date: 05/01/2011

Functional Medicine was born in 1991 and through today it has been reaffirmed to be around and flourishing for a long time to come. -Dr. Jeffrey Bland

 

Posted by: Synthesis Staff

Posted date: 03/08/2011

Video from Dr. Bland's panel discussion at Urban Zen in NYC with Dr. Frank Lipman, Dr. Mark Hyman, and Dr. Bob Rountree

Watch a video from Dr. Bland's panel discussion with Dr. Frank Lipman, Dr. Mark Hyman, and Dr. Bob Rountree at the Urban Zen Center this past weekend.

urbanzen on livestream.com. Broadcast Live Free

 

 

Posted by: Synthesis Staff

Posted date: 02/25/2011

Successful Aging seminar in Taipei, October 2010

Here's a nice video from the Successful Aging seminar last fall in Taipei

 

Posted by: Synthesis Staff

Posted date: 01/26/2011
February 2011 FMU Preview
This morning Dr. Bland interviewed David Sinclair, PhD, from Harvard University Medical School, for the February issue of Functional Medicine Update. You may recognize Dr. Sinclair’s name from his work on resveratrol, but this interview will cover so much more! Listen to Dr. Bland describe his experience and his excitement about the upcoming February issue.

 

Posted by: Synthesis Staff

Posted date: 01/26/2011
Dr. Steven Gundry
Dr. Bland welcomed Dr. Steven Gundry, heart surgeon and Director of the International Heart and Lung Institute in Palm Springs, to the FMU studio today to record an interview for the March issue of Functional Medicine Update. Watch the clip, and then learn more about Dr. Gundry and his new book, Dr. Gundry’s Diet Evolution, by visiting his website, www.drgundry.com.

 

Posted by: Synthesis Staff

Posted date: 01/01/2011
Natural Medicine Trials
The results of a study on Echinacea on cold and flu symptoms was recently published in the Archives of Internal Medicine. Dr. Bland discusses trials in natural medicine and why he feels positive findings are elusive

 

Posted by: Synthesis Staff

Posted date: 12/28/2010

The December 2010/January 2011 edition of Integrative Medicine: A Clinician’s Journal is now available. This issue features a print transcript of Dr. Bland’s August 2010 FMU interview with David R. Jacobs, PhD, of the University of Minnesota: http://www.imjournal.com/

 

 
Posted by: Synthesis Staff

Posted date: 11/22/2010

Dr. Bland comments about his experience interviewing Dr. Moshe Szyf of McGill University

 

 

Posted by: Synthesis Staff

Posted date: 10/15/2010

Dr. Bland received glowing reviews at his Taiwan seminar, both from attendees and the national media!

        

You can watch a video online of Dr. Bland's interview with the Taiwan News:

Click here for Taiwan News

Click here for YouTube

 

 

 

Posted by: Synthesis Staff

Posted date: 9/20/2010

Dr. Bland is coming to Taiwan next month!

 

Dr. Bland will be presenting a one-day seminar in Taipei, Taiwan titled "Successful Aging: Managing Genetic, Environmental, and Lifestyle Factors" on October 9, 2010. For more information about attending this event, please use this link:   http://www.buyusa.gov/taiwan/en/metagenics_aging_2010.html. An interview with Dr. Bland was recently printed in Taiwan's CommonWealth Magazine, a respected publication on economics, politics, and current events. Click here for more information about CommonWealth Magazine. Click the link below to read an English translation of the article.

CommonWealth Article

 

 

 

Posted by: Synthesis Staff

Posted date: 7/19/2010

Dr. Bland expresses his thanks to the Natural Products Association for presenting him with their 2010 President's Award

 

Posted by: Synthesis Staff

Posted date: 6/25/2010

17th Symposium Video Clip of Dr. Jeffrey Bland

 

For a transcript of Dr. Bland's narration, click here.

To fully aprreciate the experience, watch the Harvard-produced video, "The Inner Life of the Cell," on YouTube: 

 www.youtube.com/watch

What about the other video Dr. Bland showed at the Symposium, the one of people dancing? That video is called "Where the Hell is Matt?" and was produced by Matt Harding. You can also find it on YouTube:

www.youtube.com/watch

 

Posted by: Synthesis Staff

Posted date: 5/11/2010

Cancer as a Chronic Disease

 

Posted by: Synthesis Staff

Posted date: 4/17/2010

Pam Smith Interview

 

Posted by: Synthesis Staff

Posted date: 4/9/2010

Additional References on Bisphosphonates

There is a wealth of information available if you know where to look. Here are a few more article citations:

Rustemeyer J, Bremerich A. Bisphosphonate-associated osteonecrosis of the jaw: what do we currently know? A survey of knowledge given in the recent literature. Clin Oral Investig. 2010;14(1):59-64. (Note: The authors reviewed 54 articles for this piece.)

Lo JC, O'Ryan FS, Gordon NP, et al. Prevalence of osteonecrosis of the jaw in patients with oral bisphosphonate exposure. J Oral Maxillofac Surg. 2010;68(2):243-253.

Kyrgidis A, Verrou E. Fatigue in bone: a novel phenomenon attributable to bisphosphonate use. Bone. 2010;46(2):556;author reply 557-558.

 

Posted by: Synthesis Staff

Posted date: 3/28/2010

March FMU Follow-up Commentary

How can you learn more about the bisphosphonate controversy?

Click here for an extensive list of references to help with your research.

 

Posted by: Synthesis Staff

Posted date: 3/28/2010

Can Bariatric Surgery Have Transgenerational Epigenetic Effects?

 

Posted by: Synthesis Staff

Posted date: 3/11/2010

Why Supplements?

 

Blog Transcript

 

Posted by: Synthesis Staff

 

Posted date: 3/1/2010

 

Published commentary by Dr. Victor Sierpina (FMU Clinician of the Month, April 2009) on the WHI Report on Multivitamins and Cancer or Cardiovascular Risk

 

Recommended reading by Dr. Bland:

 

Dr. Victor Sierpina, of the University of Texas Medical Branch (Galveston), has had a short piece titled "What is Missing in the WHI Report on Multivitamins and Cancer or Cardiovascular Risk? - Nutrigenomics!" in the journal Forsch Komplementarmedizin (2009;16:271-276). This commentary was published in response to an article published in the Archives of Internal Medicine by Neuhouser et al (Arch Intern Med 2009;169(3):294-304) on data from the Women's Health Initiative cohorts related to multivitamin use and risk to cancer or cardiovascular disease.

 

Some key excerpts from Dr. Sierpina's piece:

 

"If a drug effectively shuts down or alters a metabolic system in a majority of patients, it is deemed effective, efficacious, and evidence-based, ready for the market. It is a 'strong medicine' with predictable, reliable results. While we conveniently ignore patients outside the bell-shaped curve (2 or more standard deviations from the mean) as 'non-responders' or 'intolerant of the medicine,' by excluding such outliers we may be missing an evolutionary edge of contemporary scientific medicine. What happens at the margins may tell us about the range of people who are 'not average.' How can we identify and treat these people if they fall outside the realm of a drug's tested efficacy? More importantly, can they teach us lessons about pharmacogenomics, polymorphisms, metabolomics, and clinical decision making?"

 

"Beyond classical nutrition diseases like scurvy and pellagra, the concept of nutritional pharmacology is overly simplified. Like the patients on the right and left ends of the bell-curve in pharmacological trials, genomic and individual susceptibilities to micronutrient deficiencies, the presence of single nucleotide polymorphisms affecting metabolism of food and nutrients are highly relevant to the 'weak drug' effects of nutritional supplements."

 

"'The right dose for the right genotype is a mantra that can guide us into future research and clinical outcome studies: 'The difference in mechanism and activity between a new-to-nature molecule that was specifically selected to have a very high affinity for substrate and that of a nutrient whose activity is much more dependent upon the specific polymorphism may help explain why intervention trials using nutients have been disappointing. Individuals with unique genetic or epigenetic sensitivity to the nutrient would have their contribution...overwhelmed...to observe this effect, the study would have to stratify the participants based on their unique genetic/epigenetic sensitivity and then power the study properly to include enough of these individuals to be of statistical significance...'" (Here Dr. Sierpina is quoting from an article by Dr. Bland: Bland JS. The Future of Nutritional Pharmacology. Altern Ther Health Med. 2008;14(5):12-14.)

 

"Nutrigenomics, like pharmacogenomics, is a new and evolving field. As we discover the vast areas of individual genetic/epigenetic variability, we may discover that simple randomization is no longer adequate to the task of dissecting important questions such as those raised in this report."

 

Posted by: Synthesis Staff

Posted date: 1/14/2010

Soy and Estrogen

 

Posted by: Synthesis Staff

Posted date: 12/1/2009

Read Dr. Bland's article recently published in the Oct/Nov issue of Integrative Medicine: A Clinician's Journal: "Reforming the US Healthcare System: Implementing an Effective Approach to Chronic Disease"

 

Posted by: Synthesis Staff

Posted date: 11/18/2009

Follow-up to October FMU Interview

 

Posted by: Synthesis Staff

Posted date: 11/18/2009

Emerging Research on Resveratrol

 

Posted by: Synthesis Staff

Posted date: 9/30/2009

Read Dr. Bland's latest blog on Metabolic Detoxification on the Huffington Post:

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/jeffrey-bland/chronic-illness-what-work_b_304048.html

 

Posted by: Synthesis Staff

Posted date: 9/10/2009

Dr. Bland has contributed a post to the Huffington Post today and will be contributing posts regularly. Read today's post on application of the Four R Program here:

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/jeffrey-bland/chronic-illness-what-work_b_281228.html

 

Posted by: Synthesis Staff

Posted date: 5/26/2009

Dr. Bland is featured prominently in an article about detox cleanses written by Joseph Hooper for Elle magazine this month. Mr. Hooper writes, "Reality seems to be catching up with Bland's futuristic speculation...." 

The article also features many complimentary comments from colleagues: "[Bland] is the guru who nobody outside the alt-med world knows. Merrell calls him 'a national treasure'; Lipman describes him as 'the most significant person in changing medicine.' At the conference, one much-published alt-med savant recalled first hearing Bland speak 15 years ago: 'I said, ‘Either this man is insane or he’s a genius, and I owe it to myself and my patients to find out which.’"

Click here to read the complete article online:

http://www.elle.com/Beauty/Health-Fitness/Tune-Up-Are-Cleanses-the-Cure

 

Posted by: Synthesis Staff

Posted date: 5/22/2009

On May 2, 2009, Dr. Bland was inducted into the Orthomolecular Hall of Fame at the 38th Annual Orthomolecular Conference in Toronto. Fellow inductees this year included Ilya Metchnikov, PhD; TL Cleave, MRCP; Hugh Macdonald Sinclair, ChB; and Archie Kalokerinos, MD.

 

Posted by: Jeffrey Bland, PhD

Posted date: 3/9/2009

 

Posted by: Synthesis Staff

Posted date: 3/3/2009

"We have to undergo a melt (of our health system) in order to produce a new alloy with a different composition and structure (emphasizing) proactive health care rather than reactive health care. We have to change our way of thinking about health and ask the big audacious questions."

This is a quote from Dr. Bland that is featured in a Huffington Post article posted after the Integrative Healthcare Symposium held in New York City last week. To read the entire post (authored by blogger Alison Rose Levy), click here:

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/alison-rose-levy/day-of-reckoning-in-healt_b_169742.html

 

Posted by: Synthesis Staff

Posted date: 2/26/2009

Today, a group of leaders in the field of integrative medicine were invited to testify before the Senate Committee on Health, Education, Labor and Pensions at the invitation of Senators Kennedy, Harkin, and Mikulski. Dr. Mehmet Oz, Dr. Mark Hyman, Dr. Dean Ornish, and Dr. Andrew Weil all spoke and answered questions from the panel (note: Dr. Bland is in attendance at the proceedings). Here is a link to view the testimony online:

http://help.senate.gov/Hearings/2009_02_26/2009_02_26.html

 

Posted by: Jeffrey Bland, PhD

Posted date: 1/16/2009

I want to provide you with a link to a recent (12/22/2008) radio broadcast done by Dr. Larry Kaskel for his show ReachMD on XM Radio. You can listen to the audio file in its entirety:

http://www.reachmd.com/xmsegment.aspx?sid=3900

It's a fascinating discussion about the anaylysis of clinical trial data on statins, and really relates directly to the interview I did with Dr. James Wright of the University of British Columbia in the April 2008 issue of FMU (see my video blog below from 2/24/2008).

Here is the program description from Dr. Kaskel's website:

"According to the results of a recent study, the use of statins for primary prevention in women is not supported by clinical-trial data. Theodore Eisenberg, a law professor at Cornell University, discusses the scope of the meta-analyses of the primary prevention clinical statin trial, and the conclusion, which found no statistically significant evidence of cardioprotective effect for women. Mr. Eisenberg explores with host Dr. Larry Kaskel the important questions raised by these findings, including whether the drugs should be used in primary prevention in women and how the unqualified marketing and advertising claims of protection are misleading to physicians and consumers."

 

Posted by: Jeffrey Bland, PhD

Posted date: 12/08/2008I want to share my latest editorial from Alternative Therapies with all of you. This is called "Autism: Asking the Right Questions to Find the Right Answers" and appears in the November/December issue.

uploads/Autism- Asking the Right Questions to Find the Right Answers.pdf

 

Posted by: Jeffrey Bland, PhD

Posted date: 12/04/2008

 

Posted by: Jeffrey Bland, PhD

Posted date: 11/19/2008

 

Posted by: Jeffrey Bland, PhD

Posted date: 11/16/2008

Here is the latest editorial I wrote for Alternative Therapies that I would like to share with all of you.

uploads/BlandJ.AlternTherHealthMed.2008 The future of nutritional pharmacology..pdf

 

Posted by: Synthesis Staff

Posted date: 10/16/2008

A listing for Functional Medicine has recently been posted on Wikipedia (the online collaborative encylopedia built and edited by public contributors). The article appears to have been created on October 8th with just a few facts, statements, and references, and has had a short and volatile history (see the history tab). Almost immediately, functional medicine was tagged as "pseudoscience," and the article was elected for deletion. 

Synthesis supports the efforts of the original article author(s). The article is currently flagged for possible deletion. Content on Wikipedia is user generated. If you would like to contribute to the article or the discussion about the scientific validity of functional medicine, here is the link:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Functional_medicine

 

Posted by: Jeffrey Bland, PhD

Posted date: 9/17/2008

I would like to thank my good friend and colleague, Dr. Liz Lipski, for updating a chart I did on liver detoxification many years ago for my annual seminar. Be sure to check out Dr. Lipski's website: www.innovativehealing.com.

uploads/Liver Detox Chart_9_2008.pdf

 

Posted by: Jeffrey Bland, PhD

Posted date: 7/30/2008

As some of you know, I have been contributing editorials to Alternative Therapies in Health & Medicine this year. I would like to make those articles available to all of you here.

uploads/Altern Ther Health Med. 2008 Jan-Feb.pdf

uploads/Altern Ther Health Med.2008.Mar-Apr.pdf

uploads/AltTherHealthMedMay-Jun.2008.pdf

uploads/ALT THERAPIES JULY-AUG.pdf

 

Posted by: Jeffrey Bland, PhD

Posted date: 7/28/2008

 I am pleased to tell you that I have co-authored an article with my colleague, Dr. Deanna Minich, called "Dietary Management of the Metabolic Syndrome beyond Macronutrients," which appears in the August 2008 issue of Nutrition Reviews. If you are interested in receiving a PDF copy of the article, please send an email to info@jeffreybland.com.

 

Posted by: Jeffrey Bland, PhD

Posted date: 6/18/2008

 uploads/JB Blog Transcript_6_18_2008.pdf

 

Posted by: Jeffrey Bland, PhD

Posted date: 6/2/2008

 

uploads/JB Blog Transcript_6_2_2008.pdf

Posted by: Jeffrey Bland, PhD

Posted date: 5/7/2008

Here is a link to a story on National Public Radio about the "Treat the Numbers Approach" that ties in nicely to Dr. Wright's interview (featured in the April issue of Functional Medicine Update):

http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=88650768

 

Posted by: Jeffrey Bland, PhD

Posted date: 3/15/2008

 uploads/JB Blog Transcript_3_15_2008_v2.pdf

 

Posted by: Jeffrey Bland, PhD

Posted date: 3/07/2008

uploads/JB Blog Transcript_3_7_2008_v2(1).pdf

 

Posted by: Jeffrey Bland, PhD

Posted date: 2/24/2008

 uploads/JB Blog Transcript_2_24_2008_v2.pdf

 

Posted by: Jeffrey Bland, PhD

Posted date: 2/7/2008

Business Week ran an article in their January 17 issue about the effectiveness of statin drugs. You can read the article online by clicking this link:

http://www.businessweek.com/...b4068052092994.htm?chan=search

My colleague, Dr. Bob Lerman, has sent a letter to the editor noting how the article addresses the issue of lifestyle intervention as a first-line approach and encouraging continued focus (both by journalists and clinicians) on this very important area that often receives little coverage.

uploads/Lipitor_BusinessWeek.pdf

 
Posted by: Jeffrey Bland, PhD

 

Posted date: 2/3/2008

I had the pleasure of presenting the keynote address on 1/20/2008 at the Scripps Center for Integrative Medicine (their 5th annual conference). My talk was titled "Why the Controversy Concerning the Value of Natural Supplements?" Attached is a press release that was prepared:

uploads/Scripps Press Release.pdf

Also, I want to call your attention to a posting about vitamin D by my long-time colleague, Dr. Soram Khalsa, that appears on The Huffington Post today:

www.huffingtonpost.com/dr-soram-khalsa/vitamin-d-if-you-cant-g_b_83626.html

 

Posted by: Jeffrey Bland, PhD

Posted date: 1/25/2008

As I prepared my latest seminar, I came across a couple of things I want to get the word out about.

First, a sobering statistic:

"A 2% improvement in the prevention of chronic disease would avert 36 million needless deaths by 2015 with a gain of about 500 million years of life." (Lancet 2005;366:1578)

Read it again. Let it sink in. Thirty-six million lives at risk due to chronic disease.

 

Second, here is a link to a PBS documentary on epigenetics called Ghost in Your Genes that I think is really of high quality and value:

http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/nova/genes/

 

Posted by: Jeffrey Bland, PhD

Posted date: 12/26/2007

Welcome to my new website and blog. Attached are a couple of items I have been working on that might interest you--submissions I have made to Newsweek and Chiropractic Economics.

Newsweek Editorial

(Here is a link to the editorial I felt compelled to respond to: http://www.newsweek.com/id/73283)

Chiropractic Economics Article

 

Posted by: Jeffrey Bland, PhD

Posted date: 11/16/2008

Here is my most recent editorial in Alternative Therapies that I would like to share with all of you.

uploads/BlandJ.AlternTherHealthMed.2008 The future of nutritional pharmacology..pdf

 

"According to the results of a recent study, the use of statins for primary prevention in women is not supported by clinical-trial data. Theodore Eisenberg, a law professor at Cornell University, discusses the scope of the meta-analyses of the primary prevention clinical statin trial, and the conclusion, which found no statistically significant evidence of cardioprotective effect for women. Mr. Eisenberg explores with host Dr. Larry Kaskel the important questions raised by these findings, including whether the drugs should be used in the primary prevention in women and how the unqualified marketing and advertising claims of protection are misleading to physicians and consumers."